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Mind As A Muscle.

Regulating and developing muscles of the human body – through resistance training, is a standard process of physiological action. You contract a specific portion through a series of repetitive motion, making sure to employ a stronger level of weight said muscle is used to. In doing so, the muscle is broken down and torn apart - creating Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) - a pleasurable pain of progression - loved by trainers, Martial Arts, and sadists worldwide. Over the ensuing 24-72 hour period, this causes the muscle to repair itself bigger and stronger, in preparation for the next time it comes face to face with such an intense level of pressure. As the exercise is repeated over and over - and combined with a healthy, nutritional diet, peak strength is eventually reached. The body is an incredible instrument of adaptability, and can be both pushed and abused, for positive and regressive biological means.

Exercise has been a consistent factor in my life for the past seven years; it feels stranger for me not to train. I have found the benefits of doing so transmit into all other aspects of the life I live; the connection of mind, body and soul all meeting in a harmonious form of equilibrium – just take a yoga class to feel the wonderful glories of this in effect – words cannot do it justice. However, the maturity and dedication I require do not come from the body itself, more so, the development within the greatest muscle in the human body; my brain.

Thinking about this a little deeper, it has made me consider how the human mind – and our adaptations of psychological cognition, are much like a mental manifestation of our own physical development. We experience lessons along the pathway of life, our mind breaks them down in small fragments, in order to configure and understand a means of surviving future equivalents, and over a period of time - dependent upon sheer strength of the experience (Much like the level of weight on a bench press), the neurons slowly regain stability in growth; destroyed by pressure, then built by instinct.

If you are to consider the richest periods of existence in which reminiscence echoes memories of harsh yet vital lessons of production, they are - the majority of the time, adverse periods of flux; we push, we rest, we learn, until we eventually awaken as a better, wiser person. It is not rocket science, but simple construction of an organ we are only beginning to understand, we don’t understand much at all. On another level, it may explain those (such as myself, amongst many) who possess a counter-intuitive habit of placing themselves in situations of self-destruction – often forfeiting a beauty we are lucky to even find, purely to subconsciously break down the muscle of the brain, in order to allow it to redevelop bigger, stronger, richer, and wiser. Either that, or we are perpetually immature.

Of course, the human mind is a far more complex tool then a simple, primary muscle. Its configuration of process currently far surpass, ironically, the human capacity within it. But as a base idea, it makes an odd form of sense to me. It is a dangerous notion, as much like the over elaborate levels of bad body training I see at the gym, if we break the down the muscle of our mind too hard, or deny adequate rest – stagnation of maturity abound, as it searches and finds a survival means, which may lead to psychological illness of some kind. I could be wrong, and it is really just a random idea, but one thing I am certain of - if you train yourself with respect of the game called human life, slowly, but consistently, you shall grow. If you do the opposite - and employ arrogance, ignorance, prejudice, denial, or any form of negative expression; a bad type of training routine, then perhaps you won’t.

Now go, work those neurons, they love to learn…

Lee.

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